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Dates

March 1 - 6, 1862

People

Duncan A. Huling

Places

A camp 3 miles south of Nashville, Tennessee

Regiment

18th Ohio

Events

Click on any of the events to be taken directly to that entry (still on this page).

Our Lieutenant Colonel says that the war will be over within 10 days after recent Union victories.

Guard duty on the Sabbath in the heavy rain and only half day's ration.

Some mail received but waiting for more.

Weather has turned from snow to rain and continues to fluctuate.

Makes a trip into Nashville, guarding a wagon. City is crowded, there are many "hard" women, and everything is expensive.

The soldiers on picket guard stay at a doctor's house whose son is a Secesh.

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Camp 3 miles south of Nashville, Tennessee

March 1st 1862

Today we were informed that we could have the forenoon to wash our clothes. I have just finished washing mine and written a letter to mother, I suppose we will drill this afternoon. The Lieutenant Colonel said this morning that he would bet a month’s wages that we, the 18th Regiment, would not be in actual service ten days from today. As we have had so many great victories lately, I am almost tempted to put confidence in what he says and time will tell. We did not drill this afternoon as it rained nearly all the time. We are waiting with patience for our back-letters & would give most any thing for a letter from home. I am out of stamps and cannot write till I get a letter from home.

Camp 3 miles South of Nashville, Tennessee

March 2nd 1862

This is the Sabbath and I am on guard. I am not certain that it is my turn, but as the boys are not very well, I guess I shall not complain. We have 14 guards on but I cannot see the use of having any for they all have instructions to let every one pass, but such is the fait of the soldier, he must go on guard, no difference whether there is any thing to guard or not. It has rained all day and is raining tonight the guards have been drawn off and we are safely housed in our tents. We drew a half loaf of bread apiece for a day’s rations. It is not very pleasant living on half rations but I suppose our officers will do all they can for our comfort.

Camp 3 miles south of Nashville, Tennessee

March 3rd 1862

I received one letter in yesterday’s mail from H. Mc. I have answered it today. I was very glad to hear from home once more, not exactly from, but from Bainbridge. I wish I could get a letter from mother. I wrote to Nammie again today. I am pretty certain there is a good many letters back for me for I have twenty correspondence and 18 of them owe me answers. I guess Leida has forgotten me for she has not written for two of three months. It is snowing today - something I did not expect to see in this state. Yesterday it rained; today we have snow, while on last Saturday it was hot enough to sunburn one if he had no hat on. We were promised our mail today but we have not received it yet.

March 4th 1862

I have nothing of interest to write today. I have the headache and do not feel like writing or doing any thing else. I received 4 letters to day. One from Julie B. Hearshel, which I was very glad to get. I had intended to write to her long ago but never done it. Also one from Jim Tailor and from H.L., which was the best of all, and one from Sister Leib, which was still better. But I must close for I want to answer Jim’s letter tonight. Today the snow had all gone off and it is raining. I suppose it will be a hot day tomorrow - good night.

March 5th 1862 Wednesday

I asked Capt. to let me go to town today but he refused, as he wanted me to drill. But as there had to be 3 detailed to go as wagon guards, he picked on me as one of them. So I shouldered my gun and went with the rest of the boys. When we got in sight of town, the wagons went ahead of us and as we lost sight of them, the city being crowded with soldiers and wagons, we did not see them any more until night. I was all over the city though they had a provost guard at every corner. I passed them by putting my bayonet on, telling them I was a guard, which in truth I was. I do not think much of the place. There are more hard women in Nashville than any other city in the U.S. The price of everything is very high here a pint of Salt is worth 65 cents.

March 6th 1862 Thursday

Our Regiment was out on picket yesterday and have not gotten in yet this morning. The ground is covered with snow and it is very cold. This evening, our boys had a great time talking about the great time they had on picket. They were placed 9 miles from here on the turnpike in a cedar thicket. They saw the place where the Captain and Lieutenant were shot. They stayed at a doctor’s while off of duty that has a son in the Secesh (short for secessionist) army. They saw nothing of the rebels, the night being so cold for them to come out. It is as cold as cold can be tonight. A man would almost freeze on picket.

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Civil War Tokens

A US Civil War token - The Flag of Our Union. A US Civil War token - If anybody attempts to tear it down, shoot him on the spot - DIX. A US Civil War token - 1863, Indian Head with 13 stars. A US Civil War token - canons, flags, a drum, and a hat. A US Civil War token - a soldier, flag, and the Monitor surrounded by 13 stars. A US Civil War token - Army & Navy.

Due in part to hoarding, U.S. government issued cents disappeared from circulation. Small, private manufacturers produced tokens, many of which had patriotic phrases. The tokens above are roughly the size of a penny. Over 10,000 different varieties are known to exist and they are very collectable.

Note: These tokens are not part of Mr. Huling's memoirs.

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